Charlotte Amelia Poe

Charlotte Amelia Poe, born in 1989, is a self-taught artist from Suffolk. Charlotte loves language and words and is an aspiring author. She also works with video, and the film she submitted for the Spectrum Art Prize, ‘How To Be Autistic’ presents the rarely shown point of view of someone living with autism. Her work challenges narratives of autism, created by neurotypical people, as something to be ‘fixed’. Charlotte believes her autism is a fundamental aspect of her identity and art.

Charlotte’s intention was to “show the side of autism that I have lived through, the side you don't find in books and on Facebook groups. The title "How To Be Autistic" is taken from the idea that constantly, constantly, neurotypical people are writing about us, with an idea of how to fix us.”

Charlotte goes on to describe her submission as “a story about survival, fear, and finally, hope. It is an open letter to every autistic person who has suffered the verbal, mental or physical abuse and come out snarling and alive.”

Charlotte would like to be an ambassador for the condition so that she can be supportive to others who have faced similar difficulties. She states “I want to make people who care for autistic people understand. I want to be a resource for people to say you are not on your own.”

“Charlotte shows us both the desperate and bleak angle to autism, as well as the beautiful side. The video is extremely personal and approachable, not only from the autism viewpoint, but one ‘we’ as all human beings can relate to.” - Prof. Simon Baron-Cohen

“We watch Charlotte go through breaking and fixing herself. She wants to tell the world her story.” – Charming Baker, Artist “Charlotte’s work is extremely powerful and wants to be an ambassador for the condition. Charlotte realises all individuals with autism are different and feels the difficulties she has faced could be a support to others” Mary Simpson, CEO of Spectrum ASD

“I wanted to show the side of autism that I have lived through, the side you don’t find in books and on Facebook groups. My piece is a story about survival, fear and finally, hope. It is an open letter to every autistic person who has suffered the verbal, mental or physical abuse and come out snarling and alive” – Charlotte Amelia Poe, on her performance

“With a knowledge of the structure and sense of the regular beat and pattern of early Modern film, Charlotte Amelia Poe brings a film that is both sophisticated and naïve, pure and troubled. The artist stares at the camera and turns, with apparent ease, an open confessional bedroom video into a touching and difficult account of her own experience.”Sacha Craddock, Curator

Charlotte Amelia Poe How to be autistic
Charlotte Amelia Poe